Subject Verb Agreement Percent

Since “one in four people” represents a number of people of more than one, the subject is plural, so Ron is right. If you use your logic, you would say, “One percent (of a countable name) is white.” Please tell me no. But I`m working on a friend`s book (a commentary on the Galater book) and I came across a grammatical structure that is common, but I just don`t know what is considered right. My friend wrote, “The society that these men chose to keep were those who refused the work of Christ and chose to justify themselves by the acts of the law.” In strict terms, the company is the subject and should, as a singular, adopt a singular verb. So it sounds a bit “wrong,” as he wrote. But changing the verb to the singular “was” seems even worse. I`m going to leave things as “were,” because “that was it” looks horrible. I have a question that I am sure I know the answer, but I would like a clarification, because I use the expression daily in my work. I was so confused when I read that sentence, because as far as I know, it should be “Almost 60% of people wanted…” ” are written. If we consider that this percentage relates to a single group, I was enlightened by your blog! So I should say that the above statement is grammatically correct, right? Thank you very much! I hope for your answer! Thank you for your clear and helpful answers on this matter. I have problems with mixtures of singular plural subjects, where it would seem that an argument can be made for any form.

What`s good about the following examples? Since you have several topics in your sentence, use the plural are. In addition, many writers would remove the comma after “life”. If the majority/minority represents an unspecified number of more or less than 50%, use a singular verb: Why are 25% of people right? The theme of this rate is 25%. Fractions and percentages, such as team and staff, can be either singular or plural depending on the purpose of the next preposition. . . .